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Bring Your Own Device Toolkit

Overview

If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. -John Dewey
Today’s education system is evolving to take full advantage of the potential of mobile technology devices to inspire learning and create independent, critical thinkers. However, with tight budgets, many schools are hoping to bring technology into the classroom without the costly burden of purchasing a device for each student. One potential solution that is being explored is BYOD, or Bring Your Own Device. This allows students to bring their personal laptops, tablets, and smartphones from home and use them for educational applications in the classroom. At a time when budgets are shrinking, school districts are considering BYOD programs to integrate cost-effective technology into their educational programs. It’s a promising idea, especially for schools that lack sufficient technology budgets. BYOD takes advantage of the technology that students already own and are familiar with. However, BYOD programs have been met with some criticism from staff and administrators who believe the challenges outweigh the perceived benefits. Continue reading...

Downloadable Resources

Title Description File
Getting Started with BYOD

Today’s students are not the same learners that we were. These digital natives have grown up surrounded by computing technology as a natural part of their everyday lives. They live in a multimedia world, they constantly connect and collaborate, and they access information that is live and on-demand through mobile devices.

Getting-Started-with-BYOD.pdf
Planning and Implementation Framework

Developing a successful BYOD program requires extensive planning, communication, and ongoing evaluation. Although each district is unique, with its own cultures and concerns, a well-defined framework will go a long way in helping a school initiate a BYOD program. 

BYOD-Planning-Implementation-Framework.pdf
BYOD Implementation Challenges

 

Although there are many benefits to implementing a BYOD program, it is not without its challenges. Consider the attached BYOD challenges and questions.

BYOD-Challenges.pdf
Mobile Scenarios for K-12

This technology taxonomy contains over 30 scenarios that show teachers a range of use of mobile devices in the classroom. The scenarios cover all grade levels and subject areas including language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and the arts. This taxonomy will also be released as app for both Android* and iOS* devices.

Mobile-Scenarios-K12.pdf
Mobile Learning: the Next Wave of K-12 Education Innovation

Wireless computers—whether in the form of laptops, tablets, netbooks or other handheld devices—are everywhere. Even if IT doesn’t provide mobile devices, students, faculty and administrative staff are bringing their own tools into the school environment, and they want to know how to use them in an educational environment just like they do at home. 

Mobility_Next_Wave_K-12_Innovation.pdf
Exemplar BYOD Presentations

Download and adapt these sample presentations to introduce various audiences to the benefits and challenges of BYOD.

BYOD-Presentation-for-District-Administrators.pptx
BYOD-Presentation-for-Educators.pptx
District Readiness Checklist

Use the attached checklist as a tool for determining your school or district's readiness for BYOD.

BYOD-Readiness-Checklist-School-Districts.pdf
Teacher Readiness Checklist

 

Before you open your classroom doors to student-owned devices, use the attached checklist to evaluate your readiness.

BYOD-Readiness-Checklist-Teachers.pdf
BYOD Case Study: Forsyth County Schools

The success of BYOD in Forsyth County Schools is due in large part to its strong network of technology advocates. The district school board and local community are very supportive of instructional technology and have high expectations for its use.

Case-Study-FCS.pdf
BYOD Case Study: Oak Hills Local SD

Oak Hills Local School District in Ohio has implemented a successful BYOD program that permits both students and staff to bring in their own devices. The district decided to try BYOD because they believe that using technology in the classroom will help to prepare their high school students for work in the 21st century world. 

Case-Study-OHLSD.pdf
BYOD: Sample Acceptable Use Policies

Use these downloadable AUPs as models from which you can adapt and create your own.

Sample-AUP-AllenISD.docx
Sample-AUP-Corcoran.docx
Sample-AUP-Forsyth.docx
Sample-AUP-OakHills.docx
BYOD and COPPA

Suggestions and tips to help you compile with the Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act.

BYOD-COPPA.pdf
BYOD Fairs Put Power of Education Technology on Display

A Bring Your Own Device policy allows students to bring and use their own personal electronic devices— tablets, laptops, netbooks, etc.—at school. A BYOD—or Bring Your Own Device—Fair brings this policy to life: giving schools and districts a chance to demystify the issue of education technology while empowering the communities in which they serve.  

BYOD-Fair.pdf
BYOD Fairs Put Power of Education Technology on Display

A Bring Your Own Device policy allows students to bring and use their own personal electronic devices— tablets, laptops, netbooks, etc.—at school. A BYOD—or Bring Your Own Device—Fair brings this policy to life: giving schools and districts a chance to demystify the issue of education technology while empowering the communities in which they serve.  

BYOD-Fair.docx
BYOD Infographic One-Sheet

A one-sheet PDF that includes the infographic and more details about the K-12 Blueprint's support for bring your own device initiatives.

BYOD-Toolkit-Brochure.pdf

Listen and Learn

Click the play button to listen to selected stories about BYOD implementations.

Story Title Source
NPR: Some Schools Actually Want Students To Play With Their Smartphones In Class NPR

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